A cautionary tale of Git and Virtualbox

I have been trying to keep the code chops sharp since work doesn’t require it very often anymore, usually by working on polishing up projects I’ve started in the past but let fall by the wayside.  Last night was a bugfix session on imgur2pdf which I have been neglecting for a while now and specifically working on the resizing logic which was hosed up and created some ugly PDFs.  All told I think I spent about two and a half hours working on the code testing it over and over with galleries to make sure sizes were right and it made changes as appropriate to large dimension images.  Once I got things right to where I wanted them I pushed my commit up to the repo and took a break for a while, grabbing some tea and having a look at why the virtualbox VM I was working on wasn’t letting me copy/paste between it and my parent OS.

Some quick poking around and I realized I hadn’t installed the Guest Additions software so I loaded that up and rebooted the VM only to be graced with a solid black screen that was unresponsive. I rebuild the VM since it was mostly empty and try it a second time and the exact same thing happens when rebooting after installing.  Asked around on IRC and a buddy pointed out to me that this is kind of a known issue and there is a potential fix out for it, so I guess I know what I am doing with my evening tonight.

Thinking about this today made me realize that the old way of doing code would have probably cost me several hours of work and resulted in a great deal of profanity had I wiped out everything.  So let this be a lesson to anybody just getting started with Git, commit/push often as it beats the alternative of losing hours of work

Log parsing for cell phone records

Update

So I totally screwed up the code previously, it didnt have any logic to look at only the target phone number so it was just running calculations on the entire log.  Also tossed in some avg calculations for number of calls and time per day for the hell of it.


So I was curious how much time I spend on the phone to certain people, so I decided to write some quick python to figure this out.

 

This is pretty straight forward, change the value for target_number to whatever number in the logs you want to look for then let it rip like so

low tech Salt deployment

So I have been tearing down and rebuilding a lot of crap in the lab lately (kubernetes clusters, ELK stack, etc) and I have been constantly having to re-add salt to the VMs because salt-cloud doesnt yet play nice with Xen.  After about the 3rd time of doing this I got tired of manually installing epel-release, salt-minion and then changing the config so I wrote perhaps the worst script ever to remotely do all that work for me and possibly be used later when I finally get salt-cloud working with Xen.

Granted this relies upon me still manually doing ssh-copy-id so I don’t have to keep typing in passwords thats a lot fewer commands, maybe if I get the time I will add in some logic to then auto-accept the key in salt so that I don’t have to manually do that either.

Salt States for the Homelab

Over the past year or so I have been playing around with saltstack to automate as much as I possibly can in my lab, from updates to base vm configuration and making lab wide configuration changes (such as setting up SNMP for monitoring).  Here are my collection of states I currently use to carry out that baseline setup, they are all called from within my top.sls so at highstate they all are applied and make things suck just a little less when running updates and helps prevent typos from making things take longer than necessary.

user.sls

snmp.sls

repo.sls

packages.sls

 

And finally my favorite of all, a working curl from within a state to hit an API target to kick off discovery, in this case its a discovery within EM7 but it can be easily modified as necessary

 

Curl within a salt-state

So I have been looking all over for how to make this happen and finally figured it out, preserving it for anybody else who wants to kick off a curl in a salt state to say add something into monitoring or begin another process via an API call

Right now this is just using testing data from my lab, but as long as you enclose all the salient data in ‘ or ” it should be fine

Strange behavior from Postman

I was working through changing my Saltstack configuration to work with LibreNMS and was working through adding devices via the API as opposed to using auto discovery and realized that basically the same query in curl works fine, but when I tried it with Postman it doesn’t work and acts like I never passed some of the values, observe!

as opposed to when done in curl

The only possible thing I can figure that is going since this is such an absurdly simple API query is that Postman does some kind of magic thats not plainly visible that changes how the data is received by the API.  This is moderately troubling because it gets me wondering what else they are doing with data and if there is some kind underhanded snooping going on, not that I’m working on anything too terribly sensitive other than helping myself become more lazy in the lab.  If I was tossing in a pile of headers I could see where the room for mistakes exists but with only three key/value pairs passed in data and the X-Auth-Token passed in headers I can’t really see any possible place I have messed up but sure enough we get the error about not specifying the version of SNMP for the add device call, so something definitely is hosed up somewhere.

SNMP, Remotely!

So I have been building up a bit of a Windows environment in the lab (a DC, two clients and a sql server so far) and I wanted to push out SNMP to the environment because thats how I monitor things in the lab. Unfortunately I have seen absolutely no reliable way to do so with Group Policy, so in comes the glory that has become PowerShell lately. First we need to figure out which servers we are going to target, so lets whip up servers.txt with the shortnames and make a note of its path. Once we have that list we whip up a quick little loop that works on each line of the servers.txt file to make things happen.

Of course if you only need to do a single server for a one-off reason you could just run Invoke-Command manually but where is the fun in that when we can push to every single system in a hurry AND kick off the gpupdate which will pull down the settings to enable SNMP across the lab.

Comic Scrape

So last night I decided I wanted to archive some web comics I used to read religiously in a format that I could later manipulate into an easy to read format so I can catch up on a few years of missed material without clicking Next a ton of times, thus was born cscrape!

It spits out the images and an accompanying XML file in the comics/ directory so that later I can write something else to process them into an easy to digest format to view say on a tablet or mobile phone for comfortable reading while kicked back in my recliner. Unfortunately for right now its fairly specific to a certain comic however I hope to be able make the code a bit more flexible in the future to allow working with any comic and perhaps roll in the functionality to process the scraped data into easy to read formats.

A horrible way to generate IP addresses

Sometimes I find myself doing the dumbest things ever, like needing a list of ip addresses for a tool that doesn’t accept CIDR notation for target addresses. The tool is unimportant other than it being poorly designed and inefficient as hell, what is important however is that I slapped together a set of 3 loops in a bash script to use the seq tool to generate a massive number of ip addresses. Its really slow actually, so slow that it generates like 250k every 5 seconds which really isnt that much for a simple task like this, I think my prime number code is quicker and its doing actual math. Anyway if someone happens to want this for some god-awful purpose have at it, its terrible and I should probably feel terrible for writing something this ugly